Papua New Guinea Final Report

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Executive Summary

Bringing the rural population into the country’s mainstream development endeavor has remained and still is a major challenge for the Government. Despite notable advancement in the fishing industry triggered by the sectoral reforms, this has had little or no effect at all in improving living standard of many coastal village communities.

Numerous efforts in the past through direct government interventions to actively involve the coastal population in community driven fishery activities have effectvely failed, most recently leading to the closue of the beche de mer fishery. Additional project failures initiated by various public agencies have only compounded the already deteriorated local regard on government’s genuineness to promote rural production. This has made introduction of new development initiatives in rural communities truly challenging.

The National Fisheries Authority Board in acknowledging the fact that 87% of Papua New Guinea’s population live in rural localities resolved in late 2007 to finance a major resource assessment on the potential of establishing a marine aquarium trade in the country. EcoEZ Inc.’s SEASMART Program was tasked to undertake the survey over a three (3) year period with five (5) targeted contractual deliverables. These objectives have evolved over time and have been upgraded by the NFA Board to meet the challenges presented by the development of this industry and the changing viewpoints of those involved. The SEASMART Program contracted outputs and deliverables were:

  • One of Marine Aquarium Council (MAC) Certified Trial Export Facility based in Port Moresby.
    • Deliverable reached with the exception of MAC Certification. This is due to a number of factors not the least of which is MAC’s present low level of activity. The facility, however, was set up and operates under MAC Certification guidelines and standards. Certification is planned to MAC’s Standards or to the Standards (these will be MAC accredited) the SEASMART Program has developed for Papua New Guinea.
  • Two of MAC Certified Fishery Management Area’s In Central Province.
    • We have developed six (6) FMA’s and two (2) United FMA’s in Central Province (NCD) that involve more than one village in the management and use of the FMA. Certification is planned for MAC’s Standards or to the Standards (these will be MAC accredited) the SEASMART Program has developed for Papua New Guinea
  • Functioning TRADE Management software program with key NFA staff trained.
    • TRADE Management software is functioning. Key NFA staff have not been trained.
    • TRADE Management software to be improved through discussion with and training of NFA target users and through the integration with NFA systems. This will be carried out in collaboration with NFA in the last quarter of 2010.
  • PNG Marine Aquarium National Management Plan revised and completed.
    • A draft PNG Marine Aquarium National Management Plan was submitted to NFA in early 2010 and shelved until further discussion by the NFA Board. The SEASMART program has not received any feedback on the Draft Management Plan from NFA. This has made this component of the contract unworkable. We do not believe the management plan as it is now is the right one for PNG although close in some areas but without close and positive NFA involvement, forward movement is impossible. We suggest that the NFA Board identifies or works with NFA to identify a small team to work with us to bring the Management Plan to fruition. We do not believe, however, that the Management Plan should be approved as it now stands.
  • Marine Aquarium trade established in PNG and marine aquarium species being exported.
    • SEASMART Program has made over 50 exports to three (3) countries including the world’s largest market the USA from eight (8) sites in Central Province and NCD, and one test shipment from Tufi area in Oro Province. Rapidly growing market demand, however, requires immediate and rapid staged expansion to the provinces to improve species mix and volumes if the industry is to grow and become successful in Papua New Guinea.

Papua New Guinea is globally unique in its strong land tenure and resource ownership systems. These customary systems are centuries old and are proving to be a very effective home for the sustainable management and equitable use of a community’s shared natural resource base such as coral reefs and other coastal ecosystems. A community’s strength lies in its people being able to use their entire marine resource base in ways that are more sustainable and equitable than past coastal fisheries. Add to this a market willing to pay for a product coming from their community because it has been managed, harvested, and or handled in a SEASMART  way and PNG has an opportunity to lead the growth of a global industry. The marine aquarium trade, as being developed by EcoEZ Inc. and the SEASMART Program, integrates tradition and natural resource ownership with modern management, cutting edge technology, and expanded human growth potential by (paid for by) satisfying and influencing market needs and trends.

The SEASMART Program has successfully trialed a holistic approach in establishing community based marine aquarium Fishery Management Areas (FMAs). It has empowered the fishers with necessary skills to actively participate in the fishery and harmonised existing traditional resource management systems to generate income for people and revive local commerce activities. Active resource owner involvement in this fishery from ground level up is key to the long term sustainability of the marine aquarium industry in Papua New Guinea. This active involvement provides the fishers with the crucial first step guidance and skills to attain success.

One hundred fifty six (156) fishers (male and female) from existing eight (8) Central Province and NCD FMAs have acquired skills comparable to any other fishers in the world.

Communities better understand the potential value of their sea areas, and the vital ecosystems that support marine life and provide sustainable economic opportunities, also provide other benefits such storm surge protection. Ultimately communities depend on them for their livelihood and their lives.

Papua New Guinea has generated a great deal of excitement in this trade nationally and internationally and is poised to forever change the historical pattern of abuse of coastal resources and community fishers in PNG and globally by the unsustainable and inequitable fishing and management of marine ecosystems. PNG has the unequaled opportunity to develop this fishery in a truly sustainable manner and at the same time support local lifestyles and customs yet provide sufficient and sustained income to make a real difference in peoples lives.  Sustainable prosperity for PNG SEASMART FMA communities is our primary human goal.

The country has within a short period of time successfully demonstrated the real value of promoting the Papua New Guinea brand in the world market. PNG SEASMART Program now has more trained marine aquarium resource assessment divers than any other country. Our entry into renowned world markets during this trial period has placed PNG amongst the privileged few. This dominance in global expertise will only grow as this trade evolves further in PNG. This was clealy demonstrated at the last MACNA trade show (the largest in North America) where Papua New Guinea and the SEASMART Program were the central attraction of the show and where we garnered intense buyer interest leading to a substantial increase in orders.

Papua New Guinea can support and nurture a viable marine aquarium trade for many reasons not the least of which is that physical access to collection areas is relatively easy and close allowing us to have a very short market chain in comparison with our primary competitors. A short market chain is one PNG’s few but strong competitive advantages in the trade.

The high number and diversity of species in the country provides the chance for a new source of marine aquarium life for the world market. Papua New Guinea has a chance to lead the global market if local costs like shipping can be brought down to competitive levels. Papua New Guinea is doing something that no other resource supply country has ever done in the marine aquarium trade. It has in fact devised a unique development system that provides the trade with a model program to show legislators that this trade can work for the benefit of the environment as well as the people involved throughout the production and market chain. The high volumes and species mix diversity is an equally important competitive advantage in the trade. It is also directly related to having a short market chain.

Cost of shipping within the country is 3-5 times higher than elsewhere, which makes PNG currently uncompetitive with rest of supply countries and will result in lower prices to fishers from outlying maritime provinces. Papua New Guinea will need to decide on the true value to the future of its people of providing competitive pricing for internal and international commerce and improving presently available airline live animal freight handling systems.

PNG SEASMART Program has created an ideal opportunity to determine a carefully planned road map to develop its vast marine aquarium resources, and a fishery that can be truly owned and managed by resource owners. Documented guidelines, protocols, procedures and the national management plan supported by established infrastructure such as the export facility in Port Moresby and community based FMAs with fully certified trained fishers, marine scientists acquiring skill levels equal to international standard backed by an effective traceability mechanism, provides PNG with a chance to provide real livelihood fishery for the people. The size of country’s coastline and the remote localities makes baseline resource assessment a pre-requisite in order to ensure that expansion of the trade is well planned, managed, and adequately funded.

The management plans; guidelines and systems tested in this trial program have been proven to be the best for the country. The PNG SEASMART system eliminates the need for foreign involvement in resource extraction and use of locals as “fronts”. Management measures recommended in this report will steer the marine aquarium trade away from going down the same path as the beche-de-mer and live food fish fishery have experienced. This is where the decision to open up the fishery to licensing for commercial exploitation is so fundamentally important and should be carefully managed over a phase in time.

Recommendations

  1. The marine aquarium industry should not be opened up for private sector licensing at this time. More work needs to be done to prepare this new industry for highly screened private sector investment.
  2. We have private sector investment and facility privatization models that we would like to discuss with NFA in a focused forum. All models presently include Fisher/FMA Community 25% ownership stake managed through a Trust. All models presently have a 51% PNG ownership requirement.
  3. There is, at this time insufficient managed supply base for this industry to be economically viable. It is expected that the POM training and primary export facility, assuming planned Provincial growth, will attain profitability by the third quarter of 2011 (Profitability will require 125-150 boxes average per week of export). Its dual roles as a training and export center decreases its operating efficiencies and increases its costs delaying, albeit necessarily, core facility profitability.
  4. New Provinces to be opened up at a minimum rate of three (3) per year involving three (3) full FMA Development Teams (one in each Province) leading to the creation of a minimum of eight (8) Fishery Management Areas (FMA) and one (1) export/feeder facility in each new Province in the first year. This assumes full funding and staffing.
  5. Each new Provincial FMA is required to fulfill SEASMART Training requirements to be opened fully to the trade (See 2 below for list of training/operational requirements).
  6. Provincial Facilities to be privatized after two (2) years of operations and staff training. It is projected to take approximately eighteen (18) to twenty four (24) months after the start of each provincial operation to attain provincial facility profitability, functionality, and investment readiness. Earlier privatization opportunities possible and possibly preferable with suitable investors.
  7. NFA to improve internal internet access and bandwidth speeds in order to take full advantage of the TRADE Management software and allow for access to international trade websites. This is not possible now under present speeds available to NFA. This will also allow NFA to better monitor PNG market progress in the trade.
  8. Any opening of this trade should be done very carefully and in full cooperation with EcoEZ Inc. and its SEASMART Program’s objectives, best practices, and standards.

The following components must be included in the development of the marine aquarium industry in the future for it to ensure economic, environment and social sustainability:

  • Resource Assessment & Management (RAM)
    • SEASMART RAM System trained. (See RAM Best Practices Manual)
    • Conduct Full Resource Surveys in all Fishery Management Areas
    • Establish Total Allowable Catch (TAC) for all targeted species in each FMA
    • Carry-out annual resurveys for five (5) years to establish permanent TAC to ensure sustainability of fishery
  • Management Area Planning (MAP)
    • SEASMART MAP System trained. (See MAP Best Practices Manual)
    • Establish Management Area Plans
    • Form MAP Committees in each FMA
  • Fisher & Fishery Development (FFD)
    • SEASMART FFD System trained. (See FFD Best Practices Manual)
    • Train Fishery Management Areas in sustainable organism collection
    • Produce Certified Marine Aquarium Fishers in each FMA
    • Establish Fisher Associations in each FMA
  • Mariculture, Aquaculture and Restoration (MAR)
    • SEASMART MAR System trained. (See MAR Best Practices Manual)
    • Establish Coral Mariculture operations in select FMA’s
    • Explore future Mariculture and Aquaculture possibilites for the marine aquarium trade.
    • Conduct coastal restoration activities throughout SEASMART FMA’s.
  • Export and Facility Development (EFD)
    • SEASMART ETF System trained. (See ETF Best Practices Manual)
    • Maintain integrity of PNG Branding efforts.
    • Maintain average export mortality below 1% (an industry best).
    • Operate using TRADE Management Software.
  • Smart Business Development (SBD)
    • SEASMART SBD System Trained.
    • Establish direct deposit “cashless” payment system through the opening of personal bank accounts for each marine aquarium fisher managed by TRADE Management System.
    • Carry-out small business money management training.
  • TRADE Management System
    • SEASMART TRADE Management System trained (See draft TRADE User Manual).
    • Utilize TRADE Management System to ensure transparent and efficient management and traceability of the marine aquarium fishery.
    • Train key NFA personnel to operate TRADE Management System.
    • Integrate TRADE Management System into NFA’s management, monitoring, rerporting, and licensing systems.
  • Certification
    • Comply with PNG Core Standards based and adapted from Marine Aquarium Council (MAC) Core Standards for the marine aquarium trade. (See Annex for PNG Marine Aquarium Trade Core Standards, Issue 1-May 2010)
    • Ensure all facilities are in compliance with appropriate ISO Certification Standards.
  • Branding and Promotions
    • Maintain a cohesive and sustained branding approach to the marketing of PNG marine aquarium life to international markets.
    • Maintain PNG branding efforts to ensure that we are not competing directly with market perceived, low-value and low quality providers such as Indonesia and the Philippines.
    • Maintain integrity of PNG Branding efforts which represents marine aquarium life that is not only high quality, it is also sustainable, equitable and affordable.
  • Privatisation, Investment and Equity
    • Create local and international investment opportunities in the PNG marine aquarium trade;
    • Develop and promote a series of practical privatisation and investment options;
    • Provide investor screening and investment linking services;
    • Manage development of “investment” through equity stake trusts such as a Fisher Trust; and
    • Ensure that the economic Bottom Line remains the operational bottom line in the development of this new industry in PNG.

NFA Board provides three (3) months bridging and expansion funds starting October 1, 2010 through December 31, 2010 to enable the SEASMART program to continue to build on rapidly increasing market demand including the all important North American Christmas season (November through January) through:

  • Provision of new Province species and increased volumes to our international markets requiring program introduction into one new Province in 2010;
  • Hiring and training new local staff to complete three (3) FMA development teams. Teams to be fully staffed and trained for rapid, staged Provincial expansion of the SEASMART Program starting in 2011 (FMA team ranks have been depleted somewhat this last year due to private sector competition and job future unease.);
  • Increasing training and research activities with UPNG and the Fisheries Training College to increase supply of skilled Papua New Guineans to replace outside expertise and provide sufficient skill base for long term expansion, monitoring and management of this new trade; and
  • Expanding intern and volunteer activities within PNG for interested international trade people to assist in training and surveying of FMA resources and fishers, and the expansion of coral farming and reef restoration activities.

A working SEASMART development committee to be created/appointed by the NFA Board to work with NFA and the SEASMART Program to:

  • Act on the recommendations and findings of this report;
  • Develop, monitor and advise a long term way forward strategy and development plan for the carefully planned, well managed, and rapid expansion of this new, improved, and Made in PNG marine industry;
  • Work with EcoEZ, SEASMART Program staff, and Program partners to raise funds from public, non profit, and private sector sources with the goal of financial independence from NFA annual funding; and
  • Integrate other coastal fisheries industries and NFA activities with the FMA development, branding and management processes.

EcoEZ Inc. wishes to express its gratitude to the National Fisheries Authority Board and the National Fisheries Authority for financing this study. We are confident that this report detailing the final outcomes will be a useful guidance tool in the development of a sustainable, equitable and profitable marine aquarium industry in Papua New Guinea.

Introduction

EcoEZ Inc. was commissioned by the Papua New Guinea National Fisheries Authority (NFA) in 2007 with funding support to carryout necessary resource surveys and market trials in order to draw sufficient level of understanding on the potential commercial and economic significance of marine aquarium trade. EcoEZ Inc. was also tasked to determine capacity of this fishery contributing towards socio-economic development of the country.  The results were very promising but with some potentially serious although not necessarily fatal cost barriers to development such as air freight, land, labor and materials.

In 2008, NFA contracted EcoEZ Inc. to carry out a one year trial nationwide SEASMART program, starting in NCD/Central Province, to establish technical, environmental, and management best practice guidance for the development of the marine aquarium trade in PNG. EcoEZ Inc. was also contracted by NFA to adapt EcoEZ Inc.’s, web-based monitoring and management software, TRADE Management, to the management of a marine aquarium fisheries adapted to PNG conditions and requirements. The trial program was extended two more years due to the complex nature of the industry, the evolving nature of the program itself and the lack of trained expertise in-country as both trainers and fishers requiring extended training periods to be truly effective.

Through guidance from NFA and the NFA Board, SEASMART sought to develop this industry in ways that would compliment tradtional resources rights while ensuring product traceability, quality and brandability, and resource access and management responsibilities based on customary rights, and sustainability based on sound scientific management systems.

The SEASMART Program went from being a relatively quick  planning exercise to the understanding that much more infrastructure work needed to be done such as site specific resource assessments, fisher/trainer training, FMA mapping, animal holding and husbandry systems, monitoring and management systems, product traceability and branding, market creation and promotion, and more if this industry was going to develop differently from all past artisanal fisheries in PNG. Through the SEASMSART program, this new fishery would be sustainable, equitable and capable of sustained profitability (to more than just a few foreign middlemen/exporters, and importers in the buyer countries). In other words a new system of coastal fisheries development, monitoring and management was needed. It was to this end that the SEASMART program has proceeded.

Sustainability, Equitability and Profitability are the three core goals of the SEASMART program in the development of a marine aquarium trade in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Building on local tradition and customs, supported by international market demand, and utilising cutting edge technology and traceability mechanisms, the SEASMART Program is creating a new natural resource trade in PNG that is changing the way natural resource exploitation is carried out, ensuring local management control, resource extraction sustainability, product traceability and branding, transparent business best practices, and ultimately, stable industry profitability…breaking the boom and bust cycles so common in PNG’s artisanal fisheries such as beche de mer and live reef food fish.

The SEASMART Program covers the following general areas of national industry development from community and fisher owned Fishery Management Areas (FMA) to export.

  • Resource Assessment & Management (RAM)
  • Management Area Planning (MAP)
  • Fisher & Fishery Development (FFD)
  • Mariculture, Aquaculture and Restoration (MAR)
  • Export and Facility Development (EFD)
  • Smart Business Development (SBD)
  • TRADE Management System
  • Traceability, ISO & Marine Aquarium Council (MAC) Certification
  • Branding and Promotions

Papua New Guinea, based purely on the size and variety of its resource base, strong local resource ownership systems, relatively short local market chain (resource base is close to fishers), and interest of local fishers, has the capacity to globally dominate this trade within 5-10 years. The question is whether this dominance will be based on quality, sustainability, equitability, reliability, and affordability OR whether PNG will go down the same track as its Asian neighbors and become a large supplier of cheap, unsustainable marine aquarium products. By some definitions this type of exploitive industry model would be considered “commercial” because profits are being made at least for a while, however, since this business model is not sustainable either economically, socially or environmentally, this system should not be considered commercially viable. The SEASMART Program take a much longer term view and deeper understanding of what is commercial and what isn’t. Profitability at all links in the market chain in PNG is the SEASMART Program’s primary economic  goal.

The Capacity of NFA to Manage this Industry and the SEASMART Development Program

It is with some trepidation that we write this section but we feel it is important to understand all of the constraints this program has been operating under since it’s beginning and some of the weaknesses in NFA in managing this program.

From early on in this project, some senior staff members in NFA has been hostile to this program and the program has suffered from their hostility and the subsequent general apathy to the program shown by upper management in general. Starting with office space, in the beginning of the program, we were assigned two work stations in NFA only to be asked to vacate these two spaces to make room for more important projects. This left us without office space for over six months. When finally got new office space, our requested space area in the new office was reduced by 1/3 forcing us, to this day, to pack up to 35 people into spaces designed for a maximum of 8-10 people. Repeated requests to NFA to help alleviate this situation were denied or left to drift.

We have been shuttled between NFA Divisions and Managers since the beginning of this program. After being aggresively pushed out the Fisheries Management Division, we landed in Project’s Division where we have been capably if not enthusiastically supported (although the latest Manager has been doing his best in a tough and non supportive environment but he has lower seniority so has less impact on decisions from the top).  We now understand that we are to be shifted to yet another division within NFA.

Most senior managers (a few have been very supportive) have not been to visit a project site or the facility (including the Managing Director) even when special orders from the Managing Director are given to senior staff to visit at a certain time (we prepared a special presentation at the facility for this purpose and 3 people from NFA showed up and no senior managers).  We have rarely recieved more than 2-3 minutes of direct face to face meeting time with the Managing Director. This program is, on the other hand, very popular with NFA junior staff and managers, and some senior managers. We are a great underground success in NFA and an above ground success in the Provinces.

One of the most important issues in our relationship with NFA is the lack of internal comunication. We distribute to NFA a report every quarter. It has rarely been distributed to the different divisions and when it is, in some divisions like Mangement, when it is actually distributed (a couple of times by ourselves directly) it is not distributed within the division. The end result is that no one knows very much about this program within NFA. Some do of course but they are the ones with interest who have overcome internal NFA roadblocks to find out more about what is going on. This struggle to communicate extends to the Minister’s office as well with very, very few SEASMART reports either Quarterly or Minister’s briefs actually are sent to the Minister’s office by NFA thus he also knows very little about this program aside from what he has asked us for directly.

This lack of communication also extends to national or regional activites that we should have been part of. We were not informed of last years Provincial Fisheries meeting (although at this years meeting we were very effectively involved) nor were we informed about a regional SPREP meeting on the marine aquarium trade involving industry people from around the Pacific. NFA sent representatives from PNG who had very little to do with the program or the practical development of the industry in PNG. We found out about this very key meeting 3 weeks after it was over.

SEASMART data management and other systems have not yet been integrated with NFA’s systems. It has been very hard to move forward with this integration process under present conditions.  This integration process should be a priority output of any next steps taken in this program although NFA will have to make a more serious and positive effort to have this happen and allow us access and active support to those who we will work with within NFA for this effort to be successful.

It is not that anyone of these issues was fatal to this program as we have survived and succeeded in what we set out to do, but we feel our successes could have been so much better if we had been allowed to integrate more effectively with NFA and did not have to deal with such implacable and unreasonable hostility from certain important divisional heads.  For the last year of operation, we were mainly affected by NFA apathy or inidvidual staff fear of being seen as supportive of the program by their NFA supervisor.

There are many more examples of these issues but these can be discussed further if interest is raised to do so. Bottomline to all of this, is that without NFA support from the top down, this program will fail or will be effectively crippled in its’ ability to build this new industry profitably, equitably and sustainably. We have effectively been without real NFA guidance for the last 2.5 years despite repeated efforts by ourselves to get this aspect of the program going.

Providing effective guidance requires those who guide to understand what they need to guide. The desire for a deeper understanding of the program and the industry has been lacking in NFA by those responsible for providing guidance to the program. We have received more Program guidance from the NFA Board and its individual members than we have from NFA proper. This needs to change.

NFA has been effectively an industrial fisheries authority for the last 15 years or so with coastal fisheries (artisanal), community-based fisheries as an afterthought. The result is a solid and innovative leadership role of the best managed tuna fishery in the world. NFA has performed outstandingly by any measure in it’s management of industrial fisheries. Coastal fisheries involving fisheries areas covered by local resource rights have been neglected and the capacity for running community-based fisheries has been mostly lost within NFA. The Provincial fisheries departments are run down with inadequate funding to do their jobs.

Artisanal fisheries development requires a different set of rules for development, monitoring and management than does an industrial fishery. Artisanal fisheries are the right and responsibility of the local resource owners. For NFA to effectively manage these fisheries, their provincial outreach or relationship with and support of the provincial fisheries people must be active and consistent. This is not happening. Most of NFA’s capacity to work in the field is contained within the SEASMART Program which was designed with community-based fishery development support as it’s priority backed up and supported by market demand.

It suggested by this report, that considerably more work needs to be done within NFA structurally as well as the hiring of new commited personnel with sufficient power to make decisions necessary for the program to move forward. It will not be easy to reform NFA to handle artisanal fisheries with the same skill and care that they have done with tuna but it is possible if NFA is commited to making the change. EcoEZ Inc. and the SEASMART program is willing to do whatever it takes to help make this reality. The future of this and other artisanal fisheries in PNG depends on NFA making the necessary changes.

Contract Deliverables

The marine aquarium resource assessment and export trial program was commissioned by the National Fisheries Authority in 2007 and tasked EcoEZ Inc. SEASMART Program to formally execute the trial program by the beginning of 2008 over a three (3) year period. These objectives have evolved over time and have been upgraded by the NFA Board to meet the challenges presented by the development of this industry and the changing viewpoints of those involved. The SEASMART Program contracted outputs and deliverables are:

  • One of Marine Aquarium Council (MAC) Certified Trial Export Facility based in Port Moresby.

Deliverable reached with the exception of MAC Certification. This is due to a number of factors not the least of which is MAC’s present low level of activity. The facility, however, was set up and operates under certifiaction guidelines and standards. Certification is planned for December of 2010 – to MAC’s Standards or to the Standards we have developed (these will be MAC accredited).

  • Two of MAC Certified Fishery Management Area’s In Central Province.

We have developed six (6) FMA’s and two (2) United FMA’s which involve more than one village in the management and use of the FMA. Certification is planned for December of 2010 – to MAC’s Standards or to the Standards we have developed (these will be MAC accredited).

  • Functioning TRADE Management software program with key NFA staff trained.

TRADE Management software is functioning. Key NFA staff have not been trained.

  • PNG Marine Aquarium National Management Plan revised and completed.

A draft PNG Marine Aquarium National Management Plan has been submitted to NFA in early 2010. The SEASMART program has yet to receive any feedback on this submission to date. This has made this component of the contract unworkable. We do not believe the management plan as it is now is the right one for PNG although close but without close and positive NFA involvement, forward movement is impossible. We suggest that the NFA Board identifies or works with NFA to identify a small team to work with us to bring the Management Plan to fruition. We do not believe, however, that the Management Plan should be approved as it now stands. This industry is not ready to be opened up to private sector licensing.

  • Marine Aquarium trade established in PNG and marine aquarium species being exported.

We have made over 50 exports to three (3) countries including the world’s largest market the USA from eight (8) sites in Central Province and NCD, and one from Tufi. Market demand, however, requires expansion to the provinces to imporve species mix if the industry is to grow and become successful in PNG.

Continue the SeaSmart Final Report with “Papua New Guinea in the Marine Aquarium Trade”